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20121120
20121120
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)
the hindu temples and india into the mogel time in india this come from hindu and western cultures brought together. when the mogels came from persia to north india they saw the story telling and thought it was a beautiful art form. they were not engaged with the story but saw the beauty in the footwork and hand movement. they brought the dancers into their courts. they were a form of entertainment. so, i want you to put your imagination caps on. we will go from the forest into a beautiful mogel palace. there are velvet carpets and peacocks walking around. there are beautiful paintings and everyone all of you, the audience have come to enjoy the court and the king sits on his thrown in the corner twirling his mustache and he called for his dancers and they come to the room. you are here to be entertained by them. this is called taught. taught is a highly stylized tuning of the mind and body together. you will see very fast turns ending in sharp stances and things with our eyes and eye brows and our neck, our hands. and you will also hear a language, which you might have heard. this is the
greets the good in all of you. who knows where is this is from? india. today we are sharing an form. we are members of the dance company based here in san francisco and we are taught by somebody who has been doing this art form for over 50 years much the ladies including myself we have been studying with him for a long time. you will see different things. lots of sounds with our feet. a little bit of story telling through mime and expression and you will learn about math in dance. who would have thought. today we will start, our next piece means the coloring of the stage. dancers show the hindu aspect of the dance by using the positions of our hands we will show you we are decorating the stage and make a water picture and cleaning the stage with the water. plucking flowers and decorating the stage with the petals of the flowers. we will awaken the 5 senses through the blowing of a conch shell. we will demonstrate the 3 duty, creator, producer and the destroyer in order to make way for new creation. [music] [applause] good morning. afternoon, actually. so, as you can see this is an elabo
. southeast asia is strategically important, located between china and india, and along the route of important sea lanes that power the world economy. it's also a growing market with a population of more than 500 million people. china has been trying to increase its political and economic influence in the region. the united states has to compete with that. by coming to southeast asia with this historic visit to myanmar and a presence here at the east asia summit, obama hopes to advance that agenda. >> now, what role did the u.s. play in the south china sea issue? and what is its agenda there? >> right. the philippines and vietnam are two asean countries in direct confrontation with china over the south china sea. they want legally binding rules to resolve the disputes. in the summit meeting, obama sided with them by calling for the quick creation of a code of conduct. but china remains cautious about that. asean nations need to work together for the sake of their economic goals. they also need peacef fuful relations with china, which, after all, is is the world's second largest economy. balanc
skilled workforces of dynamic emerging market countries such as china and india. in the three months ended october, the average wage grew by only 1.7% year-over-year. that s a record low growth rate for the average wage and as long as wages slow, slow as wage growth is brought in by china and by india, it is very unlikely that the u.s. will suffer from persistently rapid price equations. gerri: were more likely to suffer a recession, and you told our producer on this segment business retrenchment will apply to payrolls. looking at more cutbacks possibly. how deep will it go, do you see recession on the horizon or are we in it now? >> not quite yet. financial markets are not signaling the recession. nevertheless, we are probably looking at another year of approximately 2% growth, so in all likelihood, this is going to remain the most linked economic recovery since the 1930s. on the inflation front it may be some businesses will try and pass on the higher cost of health care to final crisis, but because of meager wage growth, chances are the price hikes will result in a loss of sales volume
emerging powers as its neighbors, china and india. it is about a country in transition. the message he gave to burma is in the city has given to the middle east as well. >> how much of the visit was about trying to contain china and show if the u.s. will be a player in the region? >> it reinforces the dynamic of the administration with burma, cambodia, vietnam, welcoming and encouraging the united states to be engaged in asia as a balancing force against a rising china. >> you work at the state department during negotiations. what was driving it then? >> it is a globalized world. when you have countries in isolation, they are capable of doing nasty things. burma has a relationship with korea. there was concern in the first two years burma was giving significant assistance to north korea and undercutting the strategy of isolating the country. being able to flip burma puts additional pressure on a country like north korea. >> how does the u.s. measure progress toward democracy? what does it do if berman stepped back? >> now the united states has diplomatic relations with burma. it can achieve
of india. folks, this jerk is just another liberal non-believer ruining the true meaning of diwali. first they took the christ out of christmas. next they're taking the christ out of diwali. i'm pretty sure he's in there someplace. these people worship a lot of gods. they're going to leave out the one who's famous? i don't think so. what's next, a set of wishing someone the traditional dwali ki haardeek shum? you're going to have to wish them a happy holiday? not on my watch. next up, did you know that as we speak millions of american men do not have an erection? (laughter) it's true. it's true. that's why i'm giving a big tip of my hat to scientists in brazil who have discovered an alternative erectile dysfunction drug derived from the venom of the banana spider. (laughter) you see they tested the drug and find that it helped helderly rodents overcome erectile dysfunction. at last, a solution to the dwindling rat population. (laughter) ladies and gentlemen -- (cheers and applause) the drug has not been approved for humans just because banana spider venom causes loss of muscle control, br
on the bay from fisherman's wharf do you rememberctionv to india basin and the bayview. in 1997 waterfront land use plan was adopted, the first waterfront land use plan for the port after a multi-year process. community planning process to develop -- to determine what the uses would be for that property, what kinds of uses would be acceptable and unacceptable for that 7-1/2 miles of waterfront property that we own and manage on behalf of the state. the main thrust of that waterfront land use plan was determining what the port priority uses would be, specifically in the maritime uses for the various subareas. there are five subareas within the waterfront land use plan. it also focused on park and open space systems as well as creating mixed use development, opportunity areas for each of the five -- each of the five subareas. i should mention again one of the primary thrust of the waterfront land use plan was reconnecting san francisco with its waterfront. when that plan was adopted, working with city family, the city's general plan and planning code were amended so that the policies includi
interests of countries like china and india in the middle east will increase and the role they will attempt to play is bound to increase because their supplies still become imported from at the same time, given the importance of the islamic world and what will accumulate in the region, continues to add interest in stability the new security team will have to do to make nontraditional assessment of heart they imagine the evolution -- and some of this will depend on the outcome of the election over the period of 10 to 15 years iran emerges as a country conducting normal publicity and will continue to be a country influenced with theological evolution. but that will be -- i expect china and india will become more active players in the region >> i will take the brunt of and ask one last question. we were talking earlier outside about a new country on the american foreign policy agenda, me and mar burma. president obama is going there. something is happening. is it important? how does it matter? >> burma is a country with a large population of potential resources, racked by a military government
countries. india, the only one close at 46 million if you want to call that close. but for all the firearms out there, there's also fiery debate about gun rights and when recent tragedies like tucson or aurora, colorado, happen, both sides dig in even deeper. how do we reconcile the second amendment with the safety of innocent americans? today we have got a self-described liberal who argues simply disarming america is not the answer. craig whitney is a correspondent, and author of "living with guns, a liberal case for the second amendment." welcome, craig. >> thank you. >> so you outline a number of great arguments familiar to most gun owners like myself about the philosophical case for the second amendment. tell the skeptics out there on the other side why we need to learn to live with guns? >> because we as americans have had guns and had the individual right to keep and use firearms ever since the earliest colonial days. that's the right that was recognized by the second amendment. not created by, but recognized by it. it still exists today. the reason why they created -- why they wrote
in the and and india, chicago and the condo. that speech was inspirational to me when i first read it 20 years .go the fact i the core messages from that speech are as relevant today as they were 50 years ago. the difference is the primary new communications technology today is different. it is not broadcast tv or cable tv or satellites. it is broadband internet. let's start with the opportunities around brought an internet. -- broadband internet. it is extraordinary. we see it here at home in the u.s. and it is no exaggeration to say high speed internet is reshaping the economy. we can hardly at imagine a world without google, facebook, twitter, wikipedia. the app stores, people are using to download 100 acts a day -- apps a day. it is revolutionizing health care with remote monitoring, remote diagnostics and digital records, education, health care energy, public safety, a government performance, elections. it is already a game changer, and we are still in the early innings of this communications technology. these opportunities, where we are in the curve of the technologies and opportunities, thi
support to the aussie market. india sensex still on the move now shedding 0.4%. let's also take a look at shares of olam. the agricultural supply chain managers flipped over 10% earlier, but managed to recoup losses ending lower by nearly 8%. the stock was halted earlier this morning after muddy waters questioned its accounting methods. ross, back to you. >> thanks for that. we'll catch you a bit later. you're in europe, we're weight the to the down side by around about 6:4. not mar off the session low. but it comes after good gains yesterday. following strong moves in the u.s., as well. cac 40 down half a percent. weighed town by the moody's downgrade, although expected. and ibex done around 0.4%. french debt market, yields are up to 2.1%. treasuries slightly higher, but still below 6%. ten year bund yields slightly lower. so france is trading with the peripheral in that sense. euro-dollar, 1.2794 is where we stand, dipping slightly on on the back of the french downgrade. dollar-yen 81.26, but the yen has been down at acceseven mont lows. aussie dollar slightly weaker against the u.s.
on the other. states like that -- north korea, pakistan, india, i guess the argument could be made to a certain degree, israel. they are driven to an extent -- certainly by profound insecurity and the notion, which is elevated to a level of one of the 10 commandments in this time, that the way to really get iran is getting rid of -- and it also generates paradoxical implications that the more threatened -- if assad's fall and sense of encirclement and the besieged quality of ron's neighborhood -- simple -- you ron's neighborhood, a simple man that i am, is going to accelerate program,clear weapons and not make them more reasonable. this is a conclusion that is impossible to attack or unwind, and yet it is obviously critical to the discussion of what to do. >> i think the dilemma to the outside world is do we have the talent, the skill to persuade iranian leaders that the acquisition of nuclear materials is secure? there are those who would make the argument that aaron is making. if you look at world experience in the 20th century, having nuclear weapons is a status symbol and literally a deterr
nuclearÑ.' masterful mind. nip know how many cases of polio there were in india last year? there was one in 2011, and there's been zero since that time. down to three countries that have polio. this is one of the works of the gate's foundation. bill is going to come and out talk for a few moments on another passion of his which is u.s. education. he'll speak here for a few moments, and we've asked david who is a bureau chief of the "new york times," to come out, join bill up here in the stage and continue with an interview for a few moments. i spoke to david ahead of time asking if he'd do the interview, and david is a pulitzer prize winner, and he asked is there a gate's prize? i said, no, there's not a gate's prize, david, and i hope i didn't take too big a liberty here in asking him to come. i have committed on behalf of the gate's foundation, when there is a prize, david will be the first recipient. [laughter] let me present bill gates. [applause] good afternoon. i want to talk a bit about higher education. the reason i picked that is because i think it's been a huge strength of the
% growth. lots of indications from china they're slowing, lots of indications from india and there's only so far liquidity can go to keep asset prices pumped and we're really at a turning point where we'll see oil prices continue the downward move. >> the guys in the oil pits are watching the fiscal cliff negotiations, too? >> absolutely, 100%. where the money moves is what's important for the oil market. it's always been the number one consideration, what are asset prices going to be judged, where is capital gains taxes going to come in if they get some deal, that will affect the oil markets to a large degree. >> do you want a deal or not? >> in terms of what? >> in terms of getting a fiscal cliff deal? >> i personally don't want one, but that's neither here nor there. to wish for asset prices to go down is not the most constructive thing. >> you're not getting a penny. >> no. >> you are not getting a rise above pin because you're short oil. you knew you were coming on. >> i'll quote sarah palin, how is that rising above thing going for you so far? have you seen a lot of rising above goi
technologies will tie together, and these are quotes, tied together indiana and india, chicago and the congo. that speech, newton minow's insights, were inspirational to me when i first read them 20 years ago. and the fact is they helped inform today how the fcc thinks about new communications technologies. because the core messages from the speech are as motivated as they were 50 years ago. i mean, any difference of course is -- [inaudible] satellites. it's broadband internet. so let's start with the opportunities around broadband internet. the benefits already been delivered by wired and wireless broadband are nothing short of extraordinary. we see it here at home in the u.s. is no exaggeration to say the high speed reshaping the u.s. economy. we can hardly imagine a world without google, facebook, twitter, amazon, wikipedia, without e-mail, texting, or the apple stores people are using to download 100 million apps at a. broadband has also transforming education, enabling learning and interactive digital textbooks. it's revolutionizing health care with remote monitoring, remote diagnostics
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)